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Canine Epilepsy: Creating an Effective First Aid Kit for Dogs with Seizures

Updated: Mar 19


Creating an Effective First Aid Kit for Dogs with Seizures

Creating a first aid kit for a dog with epilepsy involves including specific items that can help manage seizures and provide comfort to your dog during and after an episode. Here's a detailed explanation of each item's purpose and how to use them:

  • Anti-Seizure Medications: These are critical for managing and potentially stopping an ongoing seizure. Follow your vet's instructions on dosage and administration method (usually oral or rectal).

  • Seizure Journal: Use this to record details of each seizure, including its duration, severity, and any possible triggers. This information can help your vet adjust treatment plans.

  • Instant Ice Packs: Apply these to your dog's body, especially the back and head, to help reduce body temperature, as seizures can cause overheating.

  • Emergency Contact List: Keep this accessible to quickly call your vet or an emergency clinic if a seizure is unusually long or severe, or if you need immediate advice.

  • Natural Anti-Anxiety Spray: After a seizure, dogs can be disoriented and stressed. Spray this around their resting area (not directly on them) to help calm them down.

  • Pheromone Diffuser/Herbal Calming Collar: Use these before and after a seizure to create a calming environment and reduce stress, which can sometimes trigger seizures.

  • Lavender Essential Oil: If approved by your vet, you can gently apply a small amount to your dog's bedding (not directly on the skin) to help soothe them post-seizure. Be very cautious with essential oils as some can be harmful.

  • Ear or Rectal Thermometer: Check your dog's temperature after a seizure to ensure it's not dangerously high, indicating overheating, which might require immediate veterinary attention.

 

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  • Portable Water Bowl: After a seizure, it's important to keep your dog hydrated. Offer water gently to ensure they don't choke, as they might be disoriented.

  • Pet Bath Wipes/Disinfectant Wipes: Use these to clean up your dog and the surrounding area if they've drooled excessively or had an accident during the seizure.

  • Latex Gloves: Wear these when administering rectal medication or cleaning up after a seizure to maintain hygiene.

  • Honey: If your vet approves, offer a small amount to help counteract potential post-seizure hypoglycemia.

  • Low-Fat Protein Snacks: After addressing any immediate post-seizure hypoglycemia, offer these to help stabilize your dog's blood sugar levels and provide a comforting treat.

  • Fresh Water and Cooling Collar: Ensuring your dog is hydrated is crucial. A cooling collar can also help reduce the risk of overheating post-seizure.

  • Paper Towels, Harness, Collar, and Leash: These are for clean-up and ensuring you can safely transport or control your dog if necessary post-seizure.

  • Car Ramp or Blanket: Use these to gently transport your dog to the vet if they're unable to walk or if you're advised to seek immediate veterinary care.


 

Need Support?

Join our online community of epileptic pet owners who can help you through this journey. We know how stressful it can be caring for an epileptic dog, and we are here to help.

 


Conclusion: Creating an Effective First Aid Kit for Dogs with Seizures

Each item in the first aid kit serves a specific purpose in either managing a seizure, providing post-seizure care, or ensuring the safety and comfort of your dog during a vulnerable time. Always follow your veterinarian's advice on how to use these items effectively and safely.

References

  • De Risio, L., Bhatti, S., Muñana, K., Penderis, J., & Stein, V. (2015). International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal: diagnostic approach to epilepsy in dogs. BMC Veterinary Research, 11(1), 148.

  • Patterson, E. N. (2006). Canine Epilepsy: An Underutilized Model. ILAR Journal, 47(4), 307-315.

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